7 hour 'flight to nowhere' sells out in 10 minutes.



COVID 19 has made traveling quite difficult affecting the tourism/airline industry severely.

At at time when Australia has grounded almost all international flights paying premium prices, Qantas, Australia's largest airline, recently announced it plans to start a scenic 7-hour flight for the people who were missing out on the experience of traveling due to the pandemic.


According to CNN, the ‘flights to nowhere’ takes passengers on a journey, without really having any end destination. On its social media handle, Qantas announced that the flight would fly by Uluru, Kata Tjuta, the Whitsundays, Gold Coast, Byron Bay, and Sydney Harbour.

https://www.instagram.com/p/CFNzV7kgWIz/?igshid=11n6wheix0n4c


"It's probably the fastest selling flight in Qantas history," the airline's CEO, Alan Joyce, said in a statement.

According to reports, this flight, set to depart from the Sydney Domestic Airport on October 10 and return seven hours later, has proven to be immensely popular among the people. It offers 134 tickets spanning from business, premium economy, and economy class, ranging from AUD$787 to $3,787 (42,244.90 to 2,03,280.10).

The journey will take place on a Qantas Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft, Flight QF787, which is renowned for its big windows making it the most ideal choice for sightseeing.



“It’s probably the fastest-selling flight in Qantas history. People clearly miss travel and the experience of flying. If the demand is there, we’ll definitely look at doing more of these scenic flights while we all wait for borders to open,” a Qantas spokesperson told The Straits Times.


Previously, Taiwan’s Civil Aviation Administration had also organized a similar 'fantasy flight to nowhere'. Even though the said flight didn’t take off, and the engines didn’t start some 66 passengers boarded the flight. The passengers were given their boarding passes after the necessary check-ins were done. They even had to pass through security and immigration, before being allowed to board the flight.

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