Louisiana thrashed and New Orleans left with no power due to the hurricane Ida.

Hurricane Ida, which blasted the Louisiana coast on Sunday, is said to be the most powerful storm to ever hit the US. The storm drained out power to New Orleans, reversed the flow of the river Mississippi and blew the roofs of the apartments and buildings. It rushed ashore near the barrier island of Grand Isle with violent winds of 150 mph, as well as the nation's most important industrial corridors.


Image Source: Times Of India

16 years ago, in Louisiana and Mississippi, on the same date of August 23rd, Hurricane Katrina originated which was a large Category 5 Atlantic hurricane. 1,800 deaths and $125 billion was the total damage of the devastating hurricane of 2005. Hurricane Ida is said a Category 4 hurricane which is also the fifth largest hurricane to ever hit the mainland of the US.


"This is going to be much stronger than we usually see and, quite frankly, if you had to draw up the worst possible part for a hurricane in Louisianan, it would be something very, very close to what we're seeing", told the Governor of Louisiana, John Bel Edwards.

The people of Louisiana woke up to a monster storm after Ida speedily escalated overnight as it moved through some of the warmest ocean water of the world in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. The storm is to bring devastating weather to New Orleans and Baton Rouge. It is also expected to move across the southeast wetlands, moderately enfeebling the place.


Image Source: Google Images

In New Orleans, winds tore the awnings and water spilt out of the Lake Ponchartrain.

Mayor LaToya Cantrel urged residents to leave voluntarily. The ones who stayed behind were asked to prepare themselves for long power outages amid sweltering heat.

Forecasters warned that the winds will be stronger and threatened the city of Houma with 33,000 residents that support oil platforms in the Gulf.

The state of Mississippi was also threatened by the hurricane where the hurricane Katrina also destroyed the oceanfront homes back in 2005.


Port Fourchon was approaching towards Ida's rage. Here, boats and helicopters gather to take the employees and supplies to the oil platforms. Along with the oil industries, Ida threatened a region already reeling from a resurgence of the covid-19 infections, due to low vaccination rates and the highly contagious delta variant. More than 2 million people live near New Orleans, Baton Rouge and the wetlands to the south.


Brian McNoldy, a hurricane researcher at the University of Miami said, "Ida will most definitely be stronger than Katrina, and by a pretty big margin and, the worst of the storm will pass over New Orleans and Baton Rouge, which got the weaker side of Katrina ".